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Home > Vehicles> Aircraft > Civilian
 
Fairley Swordfish (for 3D Studio Max)


 
Product Specifications:
 
Offered By: DigimationModelBank
 
Downloadable File Size: 1.47 M (approx.)
Polygon Count: 36352 (approx.)
Uploaded on: 6/11/08
System Requirements: Windows/ Mac, 3D Studio Max
File Format: 3D Studio Max
   This product contains: max, and/ or prj files.
Texturing: Combination
   This product uses a combination of image maps and procedural shaders for textures.
Note: since this product uses procedural textures, it may not work correctly in programs other the one listed above.
Readme File: Click Here
How do I download my purchase?
You are currently viewing the 3D Studio Max version of this product.

Product Description
 
The Fairey Swordfish was a torpedo bomber built by the Fairey Aviation Company and used by the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy during World War II. Affectionately known as the Stringbag by its crews, it was outdated by 1939, but achieved some spectacular successes during the war, notably the destruction of the Regia Marina (the Italian Navy) in the Battle of Taranto and the famous crippling of the Bismarck. It was operated primarily as a fleet attack aircraft, however, during its later years it was also used as an anti-submarine and training craft. Designed in the 1930s, the Swordfish remained in frontline service through to the end of the war in Europe in 1945.

The primary weapon was the torpedo, but the low speed of the biplane and the need for a long straight approach made it difficult to deliver against well-defended targets. However, Swordfish flying from HMS Illustrious made a very significant strike, on November 11, 1940, against the Italian navy during the Battle of Taranto, Italy, sinking or disabling three Italian battleships and a cruiser. The successful Taranto attack may have given inspiration or confidence to the Japanese who would later attack Pearl Harbor. Swordfish also flew anti-shipping sorties from Malta.

In May 1941 a Swordfish strike from HMS Ark Royal was vital in damaging the German battleship Bismarck, preventing it from escaping back to France. The low speed of the attacking aircraft may have acted in their favour, as the planes were too slow for the fire-control predictors of the German gunners, whose shells exploded so far in front of the aircraft that the threat of shrapnel damage was greatly diminished. The Swordfish also flew sufficiently low that most of the Bismarck`s flak was unable to hit them. The Swordfish aircraft scored two hits, one which did little damage but another which disabled the Bismarck`s rudder, preventing it from maneuvering and thus sealing its fate. The Bismarck was destroyed less than 13 hours later.

The problems with the aircraft were starkly demonstrated in February 1942 when a strike on German battlecruisers during the Channel Dash resulted in the loss of all attacking aircraft. With the development of new torpedo attack aircraft, the Swordfish was soon redeployed successfully in an anti-submarine role, armed with depth-charges or eight "60 lb" (27 kg) RP-3 rockets and flying from the smaller escort carriers or even Merchant Aircraft Carriers when equipped for rocket-assisted takeoff (RATO). Its low stall speed and inherently tough design made it ideal for operation from the MAC carriers in the often severe mid Atlantic weather. Indeed, its take-off and landing speeds were so low that it didn`t require the carrier to be steaming into the wind, unlike most carrier-based aircraft. On occasion, Swordfish were flown from a carrier at anchor.

Swordfish-equipped units accounted for 14 U-boats destroyed. The Swordfish was meant to be replaced by the Fairey Albacore, also a biplane, but actually outlived its intended successor. It was, however, succeeded by the Fairey Barracuda monoplane torpedo bomber.

The last of 2,392 Swordfish aircraft was delivered in August 1944; the last operational squadron was disbanded on 21 May 1945, after the fall of Germany; and the last training squadron was disbanded in the summer of 1946.

.: Product Features :.

This model is a 3DMax model, saved in version 7 as a MAX file, and requires 3DMax or Gmax to open the model. It does not include any other formats to allow it to be opened in any other software. The model is rigged where appropriate, and mapped and textured.
The product contains four resolutions of the model.

Reg. Price:
$30.00
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Additional Product Images
 
Fairley Swordfish (for 3D Studio Max) Fairley Swordfish (for 3D Studio Max) 
 

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